Friday, May 15, 2009

A S.H.A.R.P. Girl Story


Everyone has that moment in life where it hits them, this is where I belong, this is a part of who I am. That happened to me when I became a skinhead, to me it just felt right. It clicked, after all I had grown up listening to many of the reggae and ska artists that are famous for being a part of skinhead culture. I had run with kids from most crowds and identified a lot with the punks, I even knew a few SHARPS as a teen, we all hung out together, went to shows, parties, had the same ideals about life, politics and music. Loud fast and aggressive, get the message out, take what you can and run with it.  

  I wasn't ready to be a skin yet, I was still searching for the right path in my life. But over time I realized there was so much to the way of life, the culture, the music, the fashion that drew me in, and ultimately kept me there. Strength, pride, unity, respect and above all fun with your mates, it was me through and through. Growing up my father raised me with the belief that all people deserved respect, despite differences in culture, race or religion. You can disagree but respect comes first. The same can be said for being a skinhead, politics dont come first, race doesnt come first, instead its what brought you together that is celebrated, its what makes you strong. Being a girl, I have often been the one to run with the boys, I always had a crew to watch my back, skins or not. But as a skinbyrd I can say its not just a boys club, women are just as important too, our opinions are repected, valued, hell there's so many great songs about us our men must love us! 

  Being a skinbyrd means being a strong woman, outspoken, probably a bit rowdy, ready to go to the show and dance and yell and drink just as hard as the boys, all the while with a grin on your face. It means I walk down the street with my head held high, not in disdain but in confidence of who I am. I remember  cutting my hair (similiar to a feather cut but a bit longer), putting on my fred perry and skirt, SHARP pin on my flatcap. I looked good, I looked proud. I felt it inside me and it showed. I always wore my heart and pride on my sleeve, now I was putting it out there for the world to see. I saw me, I saw a skinhead and I saw that I was finally in the right place. This is a way of life and I have fully embraced it, ready and willing with all the responsibility that comes with it. In the end, I just wanna toss back a pint, dance dance dance and fall in love with my skinhead man. After all, even tough girls need someone sometimes...






  

5 comments:

fucking said...

Hey will you protest against the black surpemists or is it only the white nationalists...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9hifjijf1bk

TorontoSHARP said...

A racist is a racist, no matter their skin colour. Black power and white power are 2 sides of the same coin.

Brian said...

The first Skinheads were white and some of them just happened to listen to Ska music, so what makes Skinheads in your imagination have Black roots? You no different than those wanker's in that neo-Mormonist straight edge movement which has invaded a music youth scene and inflicted your ideology on them.

TorontoSHARP said...

Brian, while yes, the majority of the first skinheads were white (the majority of people in England also being white) there were a sizable number of black skinheads in the 60's too. Skinheads roots are in mod and rude boy. So a part of skinheads roots are black, like it or not.

Skinheads did listen to ska, the vast majority. Those that did not like ska back in the 60's were more into R&B and soul, which still speaks of the black part of skinheads roots.

I'd suggest that you look up skinheads in the 60's. If you are worried that anything written is incorrect, google and youtube skinheads, ska, skinhead reggae etc and see the actual images of black and white skinheads.

Anonymous said...

STAY SHARP!


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